Legal Trade in Rhino Horn


The Background

The debate on whether legalising trade in rhino horn would help reduce the current level of poaching or whether it would make the situation worse is without doubt the most polarising topic in rhino conservation today.

Whether or not an animal or part of an animal can be traded legally is governed by policies set out by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Fauna and Flora (CITES). Currently CITES state that international trade in rhinoceros horn is not permitted under any circumstances. CITES has a Conference of the Parties (CoP) every three years, where its policies are reviewed and proposed amendments are voted on. The next CoP will take place in South Africa in September 2016.

It was widely expected that South Africa, home to more than 70% of the world’s rhinos and 79% of Africa’s rhinos, would propose to legalise international trade in rhino horn, but they did not do so. However, Swaziland did make such a proposal, meaning the topic will be discussed at the 2016 CoP.

The ‘pro-trade’ side of the debate argue that by allowing private rhino owners to effectively farm rhinos and harvest their horn at regular intervals (rhino horn has an average four year growth cycle and could be harvested every two years) and sell the harvested horn through controlled and regulated channels, it will help to satisfy the demand for rhino horn in Asia. They argue that this practice will generate revenue that would be used to increase rhino security and reduce the appetite to poach rhinos and trade illegally in its horn.

The ‘no-trade’ side of the debate argue that there are simply not enough rhinos in the world to satisfy the perceived market for rhino horn in Asia, most notably Vietnam and China. Furthermore, it is argued that we do not know the size of the actual market for rhino horn and it is very likely that legalising trade in the horn will in realty provide a legitimate channel to launder illegal rhino horn and that poaching levels could very well increase. Those against a legal trade also state that farming rhino will lead to animals living in increasingly unnatural and ‘cramped’ conditions to maximise their return on investment

 

Helping Rhinos Opinion

At Helping Rhinos we sit on the no-trade side of the fence and believe that legalising trade in rhino horn would very likely result in an increase in poaching. It would certainly change the game significantly and we do not believe enough research has been completed and published to demonstrate that a legal trade in rhino horn will either satisfy the demand in destination markets or reduce the level of rhino poaching.

One thing is clear however. Whether you are pro-trade or no-trade, each side argues they have the same goal – the long term survival of the rhino. Some will argue that private rhino owners will become very wealthy individuals if trade is legalised. Unfortunately, the whole trade debate has resulted in two segments ‘fighting’ against each other when both claim to have the same common goal, to protect and save the rhino

At Helping Rhinos our strong desire is for CITES CoP17 to vote against a legal trade in rhino horn and that following the vote, a decision that will stand for the next three years at least, both the pro trade and no trade advocates can find a way to work together. We must unite behind a common cause – saving the rhino.
It will be difficult to put the differences aside, but surely now is the time to do so to unite in fighting against the poaching syndicates and corruption that threatens our beloved rhino with extinction.

 


Trophy Hunting

 

The Background

Trophy hunting of any species is a controversial topic, and even more so when it comes to endangered species.

The practice of trophy hunting involves a specific number of permits being granted by a country’s wildlife authority allowing individuals, who pay a large sum of money, to be taken into the African bush by a professional hunter, track the species they have paid to hunt and shoot that individual animal. The guest hunter will typically apply to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Fauna and Flora (CITES) to transport the body of the animal they have shot to their home country.

There are many people who believe effectively regulated trophy hunting can be an acceptable method of conservation, with revenue generated from hunting being used to maintain healthy breeding populations of a given species, thus increasing the overall population. It is claimed that a tourist who partakes in trophy hunting will spend much more on their trip than the average safari tourist. It is also stated that hunting permits are granted for a specific animal to be shot, typically in the case of rhinos this would be an old bull past breeding age that may be preventing younger bulls to assume dominance and therefore widen the gene pool.

There are also many people who believe the shooting of an endangered species, such as a rhino, is wrong and sends mixed messages. They counter that while a hunter may spend more per trip, they will only pay to see (or shoot) the animal once and that enough rhinos must be present to satisfy the demands of numerous hunters (it should be noted that there are restrictions on the number of permits issued). A single rhino can be viewed by many safari tourists over a number of years, meaning the actual revenue generated from keeping the rhino alive is more over its life time than if you shoot it as part of a trophy hunt.

Of course, there is also the topic of corruption, and as was seen with the widely publicised ‘Cecil the Lion’ incident, the permitted animal is not always the one that is shot.

 

Helping Rhinos’ Opinion

At Helping Rhinos we believe that there is no place for the killing of a healthy animal in the name of conservation. In some African countries trophy hunting is a way of life but that is not say it is the future. We believe that alternative ways to secure essential revenue, for both rhino owners (whether they be private or state rhino owners) and for local communities adjacent to rhinos’ territories should be researched and implemented.

While we firmly support ending the trade in trophy hunting of endangered species, including rhino, we must ensure any change in legislation is made after a full review of the impact of doing so.

There are many healthy, breeding herds of rhino on ‘hunting farms’ and it is claimed that an overnight ban will result in these rhino populations ‘disappearing’ as the private rhino owners would no longer be able to afford the security to keep them on their land. This could have a drastic impact on the rhino population, and the question is, can we take that hit to the population at a time when we are losing so many rhino to poaching every year? The simple answer is NO.

The immediate threat to the survival of the rhino is the level of poaching, and we believe this must be the focus of conservation groups. However, we strongly encourage the relevant authorities, including CITES, to be reviewing the policy of allowing legal hunting of rhino, making plans to bring this outdated practice to an end and to implement a ban when the time is right to do so in order to protect the ever threatened global rhino population.